Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Vaccines

//Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Vaccines
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There are many types of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), but there only vaccines for yellow fever and Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Humans are not the natural reservoir for any of these viruses. Viruses associated with most VHFs are zoonotic and primarily reside in rodents (mice, rats) and their vectors (ticks and mosquitoes). The hosts for Ebola and Marburg viruses are unknown, however.

Preventable Through Better Sanitation

Disease prevention efforts include controlling rodent populations (discouraging rodents from entering or living in homes or workplaces, encouraging safe cleanup of rodent nests and droppings) and arthropod vectors (insect and arthropod control, the use of insect barriers to avoid being bitten). Vaccines are unnecessary and ineffective.

The Ebola Scare

To date, there have been four known outbreaks of Ebola virus involving humans; two in Sudan (1976, 1979) and two in Zaire (1976, 1995). Two small outbreaks of Marburg virus in humans occurred in Germany and Yugoslavia in 1967 but were linked to sources of virus in Africa. In most of the outbreaks of Ebola virus infection, the majority of cases occurred in hospital settings where inadequate medical supplies resulted in poor infection control practices. There have been no confirmed human cases of Ebola or Marburg virus hemorrhagic fever in the United States.

Included in this category of diseases are:

Arenaviruses: Lassa fever, Argentine hemorrhagic fever, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, Brazilian hemorrhagic fever and Venezuelan hemorrhagic fever.

Bunyaviruses: the hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Filoviruses: Ebola and Marburg viruses

Flaviviruses: Yellow fever, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease and Omsk hemorrhagic fever. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

About Viral Hemorrhagic Fever:

There are many types of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF), but there only vaccines for yellow fever and Argentine hemorrhagic fever. Humans are not the natural reservoir for any of these viruses. Viruses associated with most VHFs are zoonotic and primarily reside in rodents (mice, rats) and their vectors (ticks and mosquitoes). The hosts for Ebola and Marburg viruses are unknown, however.

Preventable Through Better Sanitation

Disease prevention efforts include controlling rodent populations (discouraging rodents from entering or living in homes or workplaces, encouraging safe cleanup of rodent nests and droppings) and arthropod vectors (insect and arthropod control, the use of insect barriers to avoid being bitten). Vaccines are unnecessary and ineffective.

The Ebola Scare

To date, there have been four known outbreaks of Ebola virus involving humans; two in Sudan (1976, 1979) and two in Zaire (1976, 1995). Two small outbreaks of Marburg virus in humans occurred in Germany and Yugoslavia in 1967 but were linked to sources of virus in Africa. In most of the outbreaks of Ebola virus infection, the majority of cases occurred in hospital settings where inadequate medical supplies resulted in poor infection control practices. There have been no confirmed human cases of Ebola or Marburg virus hemorrhagic fever in the United States.

Included in this category of diseases are:

Arenaviruses: Lassa fever, Argentine hemorrhagic fever, Bolivian hemorrhagic fever, Brazilian hemorrhagic fever and Venezuelan hemorrhagic fever.

Bunyaviruses: the hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome and hantavirus pulmonary syndrome

Filoviruses: Ebola and Marburg viruses

Flaviviruses: Yellow fever, dengue fever, dengue hemorrhagic fever, Kyasanur Forest disease and Omsk hemorrhagic fever. Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever

About Viral Hemorrhagic Fever:

 

Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Vaccines by Brand

Candid – 1 Viral Hemorrhagic Fever vaccine
Manufacturer Maiztegui Institute since 2006, Salk Institute previously (since 1990) ceased manufacturing vaccine
Microorganism Argentinian viral hemmhoragic fever
Licensed 1990, Salk Institute, Argentina only. 8/29/2006 (Argentina). Investigational New Drug status in US
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